New report on involving Pacific men


Great to see a new report out about involving Pacific men in preventing violence. This references Garth’s paper Effectively involving men in preventing violence against women which is available here.

It’s clear that to prevent men’s domestic and sexual violence against women we need to connect with men, and this is best achieved by drawing on their identity and cultural values.

New research – how men can support #Me Too

Garth has recently researched and written a report for White Ribbon NZ on how they can align with the #Me Too Movement.

The report generates new understanding as it discusses the development and impact of #Me Too, and argues it’s now up to violence prevention campaigns to build on the heightened public awareness and promote the specific actions #Me Too asks of men.

Men need to:
– Transform their ideas about masculinity to be more open, respectful and healthier.
– Lsten to and believe women’s experiences of men.
– Reflect on past behaviour and commit to being more respectful.
– Disrupt other men when they disrespect or threaten women.

There’s a link to the report here. This page also describes how this year’s White Ribbon campaign will action this research – this is what Garth’s working on right now.

While this report is for White Ribbon, it is valuable to anyone involved in preventing men’s violence against women.

New advisory role for Garth

Garth has recently been appointed to the government’s Expert Reference Group (for Sexual Violence Prevention). This voluntary role will advise the Sexual Violence Prevention Advisory Board and Ministerial Group on the viability and effectiveness of specific sexual violence prevention initiatives and activities. This will include whether proposed initiatives have an evidence base, are best practice, the potential for them to be scaled and targeted and if they will have an impact in preventing sexual violence. Garth was nominated for this role by White Ribbon NZ for his expertise in engaging men in effective violence prevention. “It’s men’s behaviour we really need to change to prevent violence so I’m looking forward to contributing towards our National Sexual Violence Prevention Strategy” says Garth.

Gender and policing – concept paper

Garth recently completed a concept paper for the NZ Police’s Pacific Prevention of Domestic Violence Programme that works with the police organisations of Pacific countries.

The concept paper proposed action to ensure police staff: prioritise their investigation of domestic violence, take a victim-centred and human rights-based approach; and hold perpetrators accountable.

This is regardless of their personal views about gender, or of local traditions, religion or culture. The concept paper frames up action to be taken over the next five years to lift community trust in the police’s ability to prevent and effectively respond to domestic violence.  

 

New research – self defence programmes for young women

Alison and Garth recently completed a literature review on the research into the effectiveness of self defence programmes for girls as a sexual violence and family violence prevention strategy.

This reviewed international and local evaluations to identify some ways to best manage these programmes. This was for the Ministry of Social Development and  is now available on their website – http://www.msd.govt.nz/about-msd-and-our-work/publications-resources/literature-reviews/the-effectiveness-of-self-defence-programmes/literature-review.html

What makes self defence programmes for girls effective?

Alison and Garth recently worked together on a literature review of what makes self defence programmes for school-aged girls effective for the Government.

An interesting project, especially as there was little research on these programmes for this group. There was more info on self defence programmes for US college students, and some on self defence programmes with mixed groups, including New Zealand programmes.

We were able to use the relevant info on best practice for school-based violence prevention work, and ‘respectful relationships education’. When this was pulled together we were able to identify some useful themes.